Monthly Archives: May 2020

Rex is Running on Dog Time

Humans respond to what we call a circadian rhythm where we mark passage of time over the course of the day using cues like light or darkness.

There are historical examples of timekeeping abilities in dogs. Perhaps one of the most famous is Hachiko, an Akita owned by Dr. Eisaburo Ueno, a professor at Tokyo University. Hachiko accompanied his master to the train station each day to see him off. He would then leave only to return to the station each afternoon in time to greet his master. One afternoon, Professor Ueno did not return—he had died in Tokyo. Hachiko waited at the station until midnight. The next day, and every day for nearly 10 years thereafter, Hachiko came to the Shibuya station at exactly the right time to meet the train which his master always used to arrive on.

Alexandra Horowitz, a psychologist from Barnard College in New York City, believes that she has the answer. She suggests that dogs may well be smelling time changes. As an example, she points out that many dogs can tell which way to follow a scent trail by deciding to travel from where it is weakest (oldest) to where it is strongest (most recent) even though the degree of change in scent intensity might be very tiny over the distance of a dozen or so steps. Since stronger odors are often newer and weaker ones are older, that means that when dogs smell weak odors they are perceiving events of the past.

Take your home environment, when you walk out of the door in the morning, the intensity of your scent in the house decreases with each hour that you are gone. It is possible that your dog has learned, through simple repetition, that when your odor has weakened to a specific level, this is when you usually come through the door. In other words, the strength of your residual smell in the house is what is predicting the time when you return home.

Research here at https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/canine-corner/201911/can-dogs-smell-time

Sillage Drops New Balance 990v3 Shaped Incense Chamber

Sillage Drops New Balance 990v3 Shaped Incense Chamber

Sillage, the Tokyo-based is releasing an incense chamber modeled on the founder,  Nicolas “Yuthanan” Chalmeau’s favorite sneaker, the New Balance 990v3 in its shapely 2 year old worn-in condition.

Wonder if this comes in a pair?

Did you know the word SILLAGE comes from French for ‘wake’ (as in trail, not as in wake or woke). Its often used as a term in perfumery describing how far the fragrance you are wearing projects off your skin, or how long it lingers in the air after you have passed by, ie your wake.

-Ed

First reported here – https://hypebeast.com/2020/5/sillage-new-balance-990-v3-incense-chamber-nicolas-yuthanan-chalmeau-homeware

Can Peanut Butter Save Us from Coronavirus?

Peanut Butter

“Identifying asymptomatic carriers is absolutely critical in stopping the progression of the pandemic, I believe,” Professor Small says. “So if there is odour loss with some — even if it’s only a small percentage of people — identifying them as carriers would be significant.”

Losing one’s sense of smell isn’t like losing one’s car keys. When the keys go missing, you recognize the loss in an instant. But a person’s sense of smell can slip away quietly, over a period of time, without the person noticing it is going, going, going, until it is effectively gone.

Small and her pals agreed that a simple do-it-at-home sniff test, using common household items, would allow participants — the great mass of us — to start tracking their sense of smell. In this way, an asymptomatic carrier who feels like a million bucks, but notes a diminishing sense of smell one day to the next, could consider quarantining, ASAP, instead of carrying on until their olfactory sense disappears altogether.

Hence, says Small, the birth of the peanut butter sniff test. Peanut butter, so good on toast, and always a friend to jam, is a North American staple that stimulates the olfactory sense exclusively, unlike, say, ground coffee — a treat to inhale, no doubt — but a fragrance that fires both our sense of smell and the trigeminal nerve governing sensations like “pain and tickle,” which influence how one registers an odour.

As a control on the peanut butter, sniff-test participants are asked to breathe in a snout full of vinegar, another household staple, like coffee, that fires the trigeminal nerve. The big idea? If a subject is registering the vinegar, but the scent of the peanut butter is fading away, they can be confident their sense of smell is decreasing.

“If we find there is a trajectory of diminishing smell over days, we would be able to identify asymptomatic carriers, even before they were conscious of losing their smell,” says Small. “And in those, let’s say, five days, there could otherwise be lots of transmissions.”

And what if you have a peanut butter allergy? Ouch!

Check out TMB’s Jars of Smells… a box full of mysterious, randomised smells that help fine-tune your schnozzz. And who knows peanut butter might be one of the smells you might encounter!?  

https://topmiddlebase.com/product/jar-of-smells/

-Ed

Originally reported on here – https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/heroes-of-the-pandemic-a-canadian-professor-has-a-peanut-butter-sniff-test-to-combat-covid-19

Love the Smell of Gasoline? You are Not Alone!

Fuel Empty

Gasoline is a chemical cocktail comprised of many ingredients
Chief amongst these is Benzene which is added to gasoline to increase octane levels whilst also giving gas its characteristic gassy smell.
Naturally a sweet smell Benzene is also quite pungent.

So getting to the WHY, there are 2 strong reasons WHY some people cannot get enough of the stuff:

1 – Emotion Says Sniffing on the gas is bringing back pleasant memories such as filling up the tank before heading out on a family road trip, or some excitement you may have had around a bike, a boat or even the plane.

2 – Science Says whiffing on the gas is firing up your mesolimbic pathway. What this means is that Benzene may be dancing on your olfactory nerve endings, resulting in a slight head tingle.

What is the true answer? Possibly a touch of both?

Vroom Vroom

Speaking of smells. Have a go at T/M/B Jars of Smells.

The ultimate tool for fine-tuning your schnoz. Play this as a game with friends, the expressions will be completely grammable.

Includes smells like Honey, Rain, Garbage, Gasoline, Chocolate & Fresh Cut Grass….a completely randomized set in every box guaranteed!

– Ed

Research Source – https://www.discovermagazine.com/health/why-some-people-love-the-smell-of-gasoline

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